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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the civilian pension connecticut affect medicaid and lots of other programs like that and the budget cut likes the idea because it saves money. it doesn't save that much at first but it saves a lot of money over time and i guess a little for to entered the league in the first ten years and more after that the savings continue to grow and grow. advocates for older americans don't like this idea very much at all because the savings are so big that means they are getting less money each month and in their benefits each year. >> so there's the question of what it means for the retirees beneficiary right now in the next couple of years and the on going into the future and then the president sending the measure of what would mean across the government. what do democrats think of this? you mentioned might be amenable to it but what about the house democrats, where do they stand? >> you had congressman larsen on here and you heard what he said not including social security and peace talks. that is a common belief of opinion among the democrats on the hill and in both the senate and house of would be a
york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affected damaged areas, we need to make that expenditure now. but we need to pay for that over the longer term. so to that extent, yes, it will be part of the -- for my own standpoint, part of the math that will have
and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he promptly declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6.7 mil
talk about gun control, or you caulk about the guns in the wake of a wake ofity connecticut shooting you'll get8 of 10 carrolls sayi if only there were not more guns in schools. if only this was a gun-free zone. don't take my gun away from me as a law-abiding citizen in order to deal with these people out there doing these horrible things. >> you wrote a piece about this about the decision to give up your gun and about a context. i want you to talk about the full context for that. because it was very moving to me and also, i think, the psychology of this is important. i don't want to underplay or sit here as aa never having owned a gun liberal and poopoo the psychology of people that do own it. that's not something christmas eve subjective access to and a lot of people feel very strong about that. >> i live in the south, ground zero for the nra but further to the right of gun owners of america. it's a part of our culture. i was raised in a household with guns. my mother later on when she was a widow, had guns. my father was my first hero. and i describe in the piece, i think, for the
couple of days for america. we're so deeply saddened to hear the news from newtown, connecticut, on friday. as a parent, nothing in life is more important than the protection of our children. the death of a child, there is no recovery from. my heart goes out to all the families who lost loved ones in this unspeakable tragedy. last night, we learned the death of -- learned of the death of our colleague, senator inouye. i want to mention today that just this past sunday, over the weekend, grief struck the capital city of kansas in my home state. officer jeff athalate fatally shot while on duty, investigating drug activity occurring inside a vehicle outside a neighborhood grocery store. as they approached the vehicle and orbded the okay -- ordered the occupants to get out the gunmen took the lives of both officers. when we lose someone in a community in kansas, it's not just a name. it's somebody we go to church with. it's somebody we know and care about. these individuals are that to their friends and family in topeka and across our state. david had been part of the topeka police
in connecticut. it costs money to get the celebes hardened -- facilities hardened and the personnel that is needed. ambassador stephens was a proud californian. -- stevens was a proud californian. i will get to my question. i guess i will ask it straight out -- do you plan in the next budget to request funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> the answer to that is yes, senator. i am aware that we are under constraints. i remind the committee that for everything we do at the state department, that includes protecting overt 275 locations around the world, the assistance we provide including to israel, everything we do at the state department is less than 1% of our federal budget. >> my question is, are you going to submit to us the plan and the money request do believe you need and paying attention to fiscal constraints? will that be what you truly believe? because i hope so. you cannot count on us to know what the needs are. >> there is no question. we have been ordered to come to congress and the med the 2013 budget requests -- and amend the 2013 bu
think it's important to remind those who live in new york and new jersey and connecticut what's already being done with money we have already appropriated. for example, there are 5,460 fema personnel in those states. there are 507,000 citizens of those states who have already filed individual assistance applications. this is when your home's gone and you need money for rent or you need money to rebuild. those applications are in. already $1.09 billion has been paid to those individuals. there are 25 disaster recovery centers in new york, three in connecticut, $150 million in disaster loans for the small business administration have already been approved. more than 360,000 applications have been sent in. so, mr. president, the important thing to know is that help for victims of hurricane sandy doesn't depend on what we're about to do here tonight. we already have money in the bank. we already have fema people on the ground. there is already help. in my experience, in our tennessee disasters, that help comes in a matter of days in most cases. so what are we about to do here? as senator co
to the folks in connecticut. having experienced not as large but a similar with representative deferreds who sat next to me on the floor of the senate our hearts and thoughts got to them. even though the secretary of state is the chief election officials in arizona, the real work mostly is, the county level. within our 15 counties we have the election directors who are very bipartisan, multi partisan coming and work across party lines with them, their counties and across the county lines to try to make sure that every arizonan that is eligible to vote gets to vote. we have a very dedicated people what the county levels since kind of a misnomer to say the chief elections officials is that the state and people get the idea of the state wins elections and it's really the counties to the arizona has been served very well by having local officials elected by their friends and neighbors in those counties and communities that conduct the elections and they are more than anyone else interested in making sure that all of their citizens who aren't eligible to vote get the right to do so and make it as
something that might -- >> i'm sorry. one point is very important. what happened in connecticut was a grievous tragedy, but every single day in america, every single day, people in communities like mine go to bed fearing violence. you see 34 people murdered every single day, and with carnage like this going on regularly in our country, when you have gun owners and nongun owners and nra members and non-nra members all agree on changes that would make cities like mine safer. i'm tired of the political debates. they're not necessary. i'm tired of the ideological positions. we don't even need to visit them. let's stick to the pragmatic center where all americans believe the same thing and let's pass legislation that would make america -- >> and pragmatism means what works, and those states with concealed carry permits that allow honest and decent citizens to carry a gun with them, they have less crime, and the crime has fallen faster than -- >> when there's a bad kid in the school yard with a baseball bat, we don't give everybody else baseball bats and say, go to deal with it and de
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
happening again. >> and mr. fugate. >> yes, i think we show that in new jersey, new york, connecticut, other areas where we have used a flood insurance map programs to illustrate risk and homes were elevated, many of them had minimal damage and were able to be reoccupied when the power game back. homes that weren't built elevated were oftentimes heavily damaged or destroyed that's not going to be the answer in dense populated areas like lower masht. as we have seen with new orleans sometimes system-wide mitigation may be a more effective strategy than structure by structure. i caution about going underground. if i seem to remember everything in manhattan was underground including the hospital entire imaging room and emergency room that was flooded by salt water. where does it make sense to talk about it on a homeowner's basis and where does it talk about we have look at hardining or mitigating a part of the a community that piece by piece -- the overall impact. i think secretary donovan and other federal agencies we work with the local and the state and with the science community. as the cha
this kind of damage. >> i the weekend showed that in new jersey, connecticut, and other areas where we use the flood insurance map programs and homes or elevated, many of them had a minimal damage and were able to be read occupied one power that came back. -- homes not elevated were often destroyed. city-wide mitigation may be more effective strategy. i would also caution about going underground. everything in manhattan was underground including hospitals and emergency room that were flooded by salt water and destroyed. where does it make sense to talk about this on a homeowner basis? where is this talk that we will have to look at mitigating a part of a community that piece by piece will not address the overall impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit,
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)